What Should You Look for In Men’s Watches?

It’s the unfortunate truth that there are more watches for men than women. As there are so many available, you might be overwhelmed. There are many things to consider when trying to choose the best one. To help, we ran through a list of 8 points. They’d not only result in the best-looking men’s piece but the handiest.

Durability

When looking for a men’s piece, you’ll realize that they’re more durable than counterparts. This is as they come with bigger bodies. Along with size, something else that helps would be the material on their case. Surgical grade stainless steel can handle scratches and is very waterproof. G-shocks are known to be the most resistant watches around. They don’t make use of the metal but tough resin. When they hit the ground, it makes them bounce.

Size

You should probably look for a watch that’s over 1.65 inches (42 mm). When it comes to the devices, bigger is better. Because they’d look more prestigious. You should make note of how big its case is, not its dial. Just don’t take things to the extreme. Although men have larger wrists, and people with smaller arms can still wear larger watches, you could … Continue reading...

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The Glory Days Of American Watchmaking

When he visited the World’s Fair in Philadelphia in 1876, Swiss watchmaker Jacques David was alarmed by the rapid growth of American industry. His letter to his colleagues remains famous, as it triggered a strong wave of modernisation in the Swiss industry. We take a look back at the most successful years of the Made in USA watch.

Indirectly, Swiss watchmaking owes a debt of gratitude to American industrial genius. Indeed, it was the threat of obsolescence in the face of US productivism that set in motion a major project to modernise the working structures of the Swiss watch industry at the end of the 19th century. Something similar would happen again a century later, in the face of the performance of the Japanese quartz watch…

America was built on the conquest of new territories and the advance of the railways deeper and deeper into the Wild West. Watchmakers played a major role in this undertaking by providing time measurement tools to coordinate this progress and avoid accidents in a very large country with a multitude of time zones. For the needs of the railway and the conquest of the West, American watchmakers worked hard to accelerate production, quickly moving … Continue reading...

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Hamilton Grade 992B Technical Bulletin Infomation

Ten years of direct research, and nearly fifty years expirience in manufacturing high-grade watches exclusively have gone into the design and construction of the Hamilton 992B Railway Special – America’s finest and most accurate railroad watch.

This is a completely new movement from winding arbor to balance wheel, and its parts are not interchangeable with those of previous 992’s.

992B is a 16 size, lever set movement with 21 friction set ruby and sapphire jewels. It is adjusted to temperature and six positions. All parts – with exception of the hairspring – are perfectly interchangeable. In addition to major technical advances (fully described in this data sheet) other changes have greatly simplifield the problems of cleaning, repairing and adjusting.

Winding and setting mechanism has been designed for increased strenght and ease of handling. The shipper lever is held in position by a screw that comes through the pillar plate from the back of the movement and is threaded into the lever. This screw is blue for indetification and need not be loosened or removed before taking the movement from the case. The winding wheel is mounted on a steel shaft and is held in position by a screw with a … Continue reading...

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Removing and Replacing the Hamilton Floating Stud

The Hamilton floating stud principle for adjusted watches, adopted many years ago makes possible hairsping replacing without recentering and relevling.

To remove the balance and hairsping, unscrew the two stud cap screws (s) just enough to release the stud before unscrewling the cock screw. (If the watch is to be washed, remove these two screws entirely). Do not pick the stud out from under the cap  as this will pit a short kink in the hairspring at the regulator pins, and cause bad regulation when replaced. Lift the balance cock up and away from the movement so that the balance will not catch on the center wheel adn stretch the hairspring. The balance is now suspended by the hairspring. By tilting the cock toward the stud side, the stud will fall out.

When the hairspring has been staked on the balance staff in the proper location, and the balance and hairspring are ready to be replaced in the watch, pick up the balance by the arm or rim, placing the balance with the jewel pin in the slot of the fork. Move the balance around so that the stud is within the ark A B (as indicated in Figure I) … Continue reading...

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Hamilton caliber 747 movement – specifications and photo

Hamilton caliber 747 is U.S.A movement from 1940s.

Functions: sub second

Manual-winding movement with 17 jewels.

F = 18000 A/h

Power reserve: N/A

Diameter: 23.2 mm

Hamilton caliber 747 movement – specifications and photo

More information:

Design: Hamilton Grade 747 is a modern three-quarter plate movement with wide bevels on the bridges and the pillar plate. Both bridges and the pillar plate are rhodium plated. The balance cock and both bridges employ integral steady pins. And a case alignment slot in the pillar plate provides for accurate and secure location of the movement in a case. While Grade 747 is the first 8/0 movement Hamilton has ever manufactured in quantity, it is not the first one it has ever designed or made. Hamilton engineers and technicians have been designing and building and studying experimental 8/0 models for more than 10 years. While work on the movement was virtually abandoned during World War II, final development was not sacrificed. The experience and new knowledge acquired building war timepieces proved to be precisely the experience and knowledge needed to complete the project.

Grade 747 is a fine movement through and through. It is a fine looking movement. More than that, it is a fine watch to service or repair. … Continue reading...

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Hamilton caliber 721 movement – specifications and photo

Hamilton caliber 721 is U.S.A movement from 1940s.

Functions: N/A

Manual-winding movement with 17 jewels.

F = 18000 A/h

Power reserve: 36 hours

Dimensions: 1.00 x 0.50 mm

Hamilton caliber 721 movement – specifications and photo

More information:

Hamilton Grade 721 – 21/0 Size Watch

Hamilton Grade 721 is a complete new watch in the important 21/0 size. It has been designed to eliminate certain weaknesses common to all small watches, and the many basic innovations in its design and construction insure an extremely rugged movement which is capable of maintained accuracy.

Many of the technical developments and improvements – which assure smoother operation and greater ease of repair – are also incorporated in the recent Grade 911 Hamilton movement.

Quick starting and uniform power are assured by improved escapement and newly designed center, third and fourth wheels; and third, fourth and escape pinions.

New top-grooved balance staff and a balance wheel made of the harder new alloy Aurium for greater rigidity are features of the new 721 grade movement. They also permit rapid removal of staff and greatly reduce danger of damage to balance wheel hole.

Balance pivot and jewels have been scientifically proportioned to reduce friction and insure better retention of oil. High quality ruby and … Continue reading...

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Hamilton 0552 Pilot 1975 Manual Chronograph

In the early ’70s, the company still produced watches made in Switzerland for various military contracts, and this Hamilton is one produced for Britain’s Royal Air Force.
Steel, waterproof, two-register chronograph issued in 1970. The watch has a heavy, asymmetric case with recessed winder, fixed bars, heavy screw back, and round waterproof pushers. The rear of the case has the British broad arrow and the issue numbers, showing it was issued in 1970.
The watch features a gloss black dial with outer minute track and two subsidiary dials at three and nine, with the continuous seconds at nine and the thirty-minute register at three. There are large Arabic sic and twelve numerals in heavy luminous, while the rest of the numbers are smaller Arabic in white paint. The hands are white paint pencil style with large luminous inserts, and the sweep center seconds is also painted white. The dial is signed “Hamilton” and has the broad arrow (UK government property) mark and the circled “T” (signifying the use ot tritium) on the dial. The watch is powered by a seventeen-jewel ETA 7733 movement with Incabloc shock protection; the movement is signed “Hamilton” on the main bridge. The watch was a … Continue reading...

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Servicing Hamilton Grade 694 Calendar

Disassembly of Calendar Mechanism
Remove minute work cock by taking out the two small screws. (The large screw holds the setting cap spring in place).
Take off the date jumper guard but exercise caution to prevent the date jumper and spring from becoming lost. Remove the date jumper and spring.
Lift the intermediate date wheel with its small plate as an assembly. Turn the date indicator driving wheel cap with tweezers so that either one of the two notches lines up with a tooth of the date indicator.
Remove the date indicator by gently lifting with tweezers near the setting stem.
Turn the date indicator wheel, if necessary, so that the finger or cam is pointing away from the headed post “A” which holds the slide in position.
Grasp slide at point shown by arrow and pull toward driving wheel (same direction as arrow). Lift gently and complete assembly can be removed. Slide and wheel or gear may be parted for cleaning. Remove the slide spring.

Lubrication
Use Hamilton PML grease at points shown by arrows.
Minute wheel and setting wheel posts.
Date indicator driving wheel post.
Intermediate date wheel post.
Slide guiding headed post.
Indexing finger (visible thru opening … Continue reading...

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